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Field of Science According To Wordle

"Word cloud" using Wordle.
I borrowed select text from the Wikipedia article for Fields of Science, added a bunch of Field of Science's to the mix as well as increased the number of instances of major categories of sciences. From there I pasted it into the Wordle text field and hit go. I also had to select Do Not Remove Common Words under the Language menu in order for "of" to show up, and having done the initial setup in a Word document, I knew the quantity of Maximum words...(418) under the Layout menu.

My two favored fonts were Steelfish and Superclarendon Black, and I ended up selecting between the two until I got a result I could live with. Trouble is, once you get going, it's hard to stop, thinking the perfect word cloud is always just one variable change away.

Anyway, too much fun, mildly addictive, and I recommend it to anyone. Should you need a reason, consider following my lead, only with your own unique spin and the aim of creating a header image for Field of Science.

Comments

  1. If you were waiting for a reason to give Wordle a whirl (and who am I kidding, of course you were), I can think of no better excuse than the 150th anniversary of the publication of Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species...

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