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The Evolution of Field of Science: Circa Late March 2009 - Signs of Life Era

The occasional series marking significant changes in the state of affairs around these here parts.

What's special about now? Well, as of last weekend, Field of Science has successfully assimilated its second otherwise preexisting (read: formerly of blogspot) established science blogger.

PLEKTIXSecond, you say? When was the first? Well, the FIRST (future bragging rights) to leap was Ben Allen who brought his blog PLEKTIX over to FOS back on February 25, 2009. Being the first, there was a lot that could have gone wrong--you'd think--but a month has passed and Ben is still with us. I think he might even be happy to be here. So say hello to Ben if you haven't already. And while you're over there, maybe ask him for some stocks picks. He's a natural when it comes to spotting future potential.

Genomics, Evolution, and PseudoscienceThe SECOND mad scientist to dive in is Steven Salzberg who added his blog Genomics, Evolution, and Pseudoscience to Field of Science this past Sunday. You'll find Steven's blog in the header quick links under "GenoEvoPseudo", and its new url is http://genome.fieldofscience.com/.

I also want to welcome both Ben's and Steven's constant readers. I hope you find the new surroundings complimentary to Ben's and Steven's blogs.

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